2018 Program Schedule

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Click here for Program Descriptions.

Friday
7:30 - 8:45 9:00 - 10:00 10:15 - 11:15 11:45 - 1:00 1:15 - 2:15 2:30 - 3:30 3:45 - 4:45 5:30 - 9:00
7:30 - 8:15
Check-in
__________
7:30 - 8:30
Continental Breakfast
__________
8:15 - 8:45
Orientation

Fitzsimons
F11 Irish Church Records (2 hrs)

LUNCHEON
Kate Chadbourne

"Fairy Paths & Ancient Ways: Songs and Stories of Roads and Remembering"

Collins
F31 Tracing Irish Ancestors in the National Archives - in England

Grenham
F41 Valuation Office (Ordnance Survey, Pre-publication Records, Griffith's and Revisions)

BANQUET
Katie & Friends

"Songs From Both Sides of the Atlantic"

Rencher
F12 Introduction to Irish Internet Sites

Holland
F21 Family History on Your Smartphone or Tablet

Rencher
F32 Chasing the Poor and the Landless

Betit
F42 Irish and Irish Immigrant Societies and Their Records

Galvin
F51 Mapping Your Ancestral Home In Ireland Using Google Earth

Williams
F13 First Steps in Search for Welsh Ancestors

Gleeson
F22 Adding DNA to Your Genealogical Toolkit

Williams
F33 Mapping Your Celtic Ancestry: by Surname, by DNA, by Place

Gleeson
F43 Using Autosomal DNA to Find Cousins and Break Through Brick Walls

Collins
F52 Birth, Marriage and Death Records in the National Archives - in England

Woodcock
F14 In Search of Your Scottish Ancestors

Moughty
F23 Seeking Your Scots-Irish Ancestry

Durie
F34 Scottish Records You Cannot Get on Ancestry.com (2 hrs)

Moughty
F53 The Public Records Office of Northern Ireland Online and Off

Saturday
7:30 - 8:45 9:00 - 10:00 10:15 - 11:15 11:45 - 1:00 1:15 - 2:15 2:30 - 3:30 3:45 - 4:45 6:30 - 9:00
7:30 - 8:15
Check-in
__________
7:30 - 8:30
Continental Breakfast
__________
8:15 - 8:45
Orientation

Moughty
S11 Strategies for Finding the Origins of Your Irish Ancestors

Rencher
S21 Mining the Destination Data

LUNCHEON
Sharon Kennedy

"The Strike for Bread and Roses, Lawrence: 1912"

Fitzsimons
S31 Education and Occupational Records

Grenham
S41 Things You Didn't Know You Didn't Know About Irish Genealogy

WRAP-UP
Raffle Drawings
__________
Final Collection of Evaluations
__________
Announcement of CCC 2020 Location, Venue, and Schedule
PUB QUIZ

Betit
S12 Using Canadian Records for Your Irish Research

Schnelle
S22 Townland Valuation Translator

Durie
S32 Why the Scots and Irish (Welsh, Bretons, Picts etc.) are NOT 'Celtic'!

Moughty
S42 Irish Civil Registration and Church Records - It's a New World!

Williams
S13 Next Steps in Search for Welsh Ancestors

Collins
S23 There and Back Again

Gleeson
S33 Using Y-DNA to Research Your Surname

Betit
S43 Using Ancestry DNA

Durie
S14 Scots Migrations to Colonial America

Woodcock
S24 They Were Highlanders

Daly
S34 Transatlantic Genealogy: Linking American Ancestors to Ireland

Woodcock
S44 Step AWAY from the Computer

      *Schedule subject to change. (Revised Mar. 6)

2018 Program Descriptions

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Friday, August 10

Irish Church Records

with Fiona Fitzsimons


Researchers often find the earliest evidence for Irish ancestors in the surviving church records. This lecture explores the many faith communities that coexisted in Ireland from the 1600s to the 20th Century (Roman Catholic, Episcopalian, Reformed Protestant, and Jewish); what records they made and where you can find them.

Introduction to Irish Internet Sites

with David Rencher


The Internet has created an explosion in Irish genealogy with more relevant materials being added each day. This talk is an introduction to established Internet sites and some of the newest sites that are bedrock sources for conducting research in Ireland.


First Steps in Search for Welsh Ancestors

with Darris Williams


Discover information about your Welsh ancestors through key research principles and basic records. Be prepared with the tools to search and sort common names effectively. Learn about online records proving information about your ancestor and which John Jones is really yours!

In Search of Your Scottish Ancestors: Search Your Roots, Discover Your Heritage

with Christine Woodcock


While many people want to know more about their Scottish heritage, they don’t know where to begin. Fortunately, researching our Scottish ancestors is a fairly easy task. Knowing where to look is usually where we get tied up. This talk will get you started in researching your Scottish ancestry as well as how to make the most of your research by exploring how to reach out to others with similar research, helpful websites, Scottish history societies, and more.

Family History on Your Smartphone or Tablet

with Pamela Holland


Ever wonder how to use your smart device to retrieve, store, and share your genealogical data? This talk will cover family trees, note taking, oral history, photos, family stories, and more.


Adding DNA to Your Genealogical Toolkit

with Maurice Gleeson


DNA has become an indispensable tool for a genealogical toolkit. This introductory talk explains the basics of DNA testing, the three main types of test, how each one can be applied in practice (with examples), and which is best to address the genealogical dead ends specific to your family tree.


Seeking Your Scots-Irish Ancestry

with Donna Moughty


For those researching early Scots-Irish ancestry, focusing on U.S. resources can give one a real passport to finding the right place and time in Ireland. Identifying the initial location in the U.S. as well as understanding migration patterns throughout the U.S. is key to the search.


Fairy Paths and Ancient Ways: Songs and Stories of Roads and Remembering

with Kate Chadbourne


Kate Chadbourne is a singer, storyteller, and scholar. Join her on a journey down Irish by-ways in this program of traditional songs and stories that touch on the lore and significance of paths and roads. Meet na daoine maithe, "the good folk," and learn of the peril and promise connected with their ancient ways – literally and metaphorically. Come sing, laugh, and enjoy the sounds of harp, flute, and whistle, and walk down your family’s pathway to the past.

Tracing Irish Ancestors in The National Archives – in England

with Audrey Collins


Less than a century ago, all of Ireland was part of the United Kingdom; six of its northern counties, making up Northern Ireland, still are. Many records relating to our ancestors are to be found in the UK and not in Ireland. There are some records in The National Archives that have obvious Irish descriptions, but there are many more hidden treasures in UK-wide collections, such as the armed forces, the merchant navy, and much more. Better still, increasing numbers of these are now online.

Chasing the Poor and the Landless

with David Rencher


Defining the landless and alternate record sources is crucial for identifying the poorest of the poor. The records of the Irish poor are voluminous, but scattered throughout the country. This session helps you understand where and how to approach this particular type of problem.


Mapping Your Celtic Ancestry: by Surname, by DNA, by Place

with Darris Williams


Learn how to use maps in ways that will improve what you know about your ancestors and reveal their world in context. Some maps are ready to view; learn to create others from information you gather in your research.


Scottish Records You Cannot Get on Ancestry.com

with Dr. Bruce Durie


Scotland has the longest-reaching, best-preserved and most accessible records on the planet, including a great deal online. This talk -- of special interest to those trying to connect Ulster Scots to earlier records in Scotland -- will deal mainly with the sources in ScotlandsPeople, ScotlandsPlaces, and the National Library of Scotland, and more.

Valuation Office (Ordnance Survey, Pre-Publication Records, Griffith's and Revisions)

with John Grenham


The most useful Irish nineteenth-century census substitutes are usually approached as if they were separate. These records are best understood when seen as part of an inter-connected process. The talk will trace the evolution of the measuring of Ireland and the records it produced between the 1820s and the 1970s, with emphasis on the practical usefulness of each record class.

Irish and Irish Immigrant Societies and Their Records

with Kyle Betit


Identify societies in Ireland and abroad: how to use their records to trace immigrant origins; document ancestors in Ireland; and fill in the stories of an Irish family history. Society memberships and records may be key to important genealogical information about members.


Using Autosomal DNA to Find Cousins and Break Through Brick Walls

with Maurice Gleeson


The most popular of the DNA tests is the autosomal test because it helps in researching all of your ancestral lines (as opposed to Y-DNA and mitochondrial DNA). This talk explores the basic science behind autosomal DNA testing, the secrets to successfully applying it, and how to combine it with other tests and genealogy to help answer specific genealogical questions.

Mapping Your Ancestral Home in Ireland Using Google Earth

with Nora Galvin


Discover how mapping with Google Earth can identify Irish jurisdictions in relation to each other and to today’s locales in Ireland. Compare old maps to new and learn whether the old cottage is still standing. Case studies as illustration.


Birth, Marriage and Death Records in The National Archives – in England

with Audrey Collins


Birth, marriage and death records are not held at The National Archives – apart from the thousands of files that we DO hold! Civil registers are in the appropriate General Register Office, and parish records are in county archives, or in national repositories outside England. But that leaves registers from nonconformist congregations, the armed forces, consulates, and churches abroad, and British-registered ships. There is even more information recorded in other records.

The Public Records Office of Northern Ireland Online and Off

with Donna Moughty


Discover the treasure trove of records at the Public Records Office of Northern Ireland for your Ulster ancestors, and maybe even some of your ancestors from the Republic of Ireland.

Songs From Both Sides of the Atlantic

with Katie & Friends


After dinner, enjoy a sampling of 250+ years of Celtic music from three continents. In music and song, four Boston performers identify traditional themes, their modern descendants, and elements of cross-cultural influences.

Saturday, August 11

Strategies for Finding the Origins of Your Irish Ancestors

with Donna Moughty


Success in Irish research is dependent on discovering the exact location in Ireland of one’s ancestors. Learn strategies for finding the information in U.S records. This lecture will explore the myth and reality of Irish records, family sources for discovering Irish localities and answering "What’s an Irish Townland?"(an Irish administrative district).

Using Canadian Records for Your Irish Research

with Kyle Betit


Learn sources and strategies for tracing Irish immigrants who settled in Canada back to a specific place of origin in Ireland; determine when to look at records from Ireland and when your research needs to stay in Canada. Sources will include immigration records, border crossing records, civil registration, church records, land records, newspapers, cemeteries, and military records. Strategies include research of collateral relatives and types of migration.

Next Steps in Search for Welsh Ancestors

with Darris Williams


Discover extra steps to ensure you have the correct Welsh ancestor: careful analysis and the use of under-utilized records and collaboration with other descendants of your ancestor through DNA testing and pedigree matching. Discussion of records and strategies for success.

Scots Migrations to Colonial America

with Dr. Bruce Durie


The Scots got to early America by a variety of routes and for various reasons. Lowland Scots (both those who came directly and those who had lived in Ulster) greatly outnumbered Highlanders. This talk will consider their original destinations in America, and the migration routes by which they afterwards travelled. It will also deal with the misleading terms Scots-Irish and Celtic – and why both should be avoided.

Mining the Destination Data

with David Rencher


Using all the data available to determine the number of touch points needed to successfully identify your emigrant ancestor using an Irish example. Comparative analysis yields clues that may not be identifiable in any other manner.


Townland Valuation Translator

with John Schnelle


The Irish Valuation Office Field Books have the potential to paint a detailed picture of the lives of our ancestors — the limitations, the possibilities, and the hard realities they faced. This talk explores the use of the presenter’s website to detail your ancestor’s life in rural Ireland.


There and Back Again (Going Away Doesn't Mean Staying Away)

with Audrey Collins


It is easy to think of emigration as a one-way process, but not everyone who went to live in another country stayed there permanently. As more and more records are indexed online, you may find family members in unexpected places, and as a result discover that your "stay at home" ancestors were more well-travelled than you thought. There are lots or reasons for leaving your country of birth, but all kinds of factors might propel you back there, too.

They Were Highlanders

with Christine Woodcock


In this session, you will learn about the importance of the events in Scottish history (and the clues they left behind) that led to large number of Scots leaving their homeland for life in the Americas. You will learn how to bridge the gap between finding them in North American records (birth, marriage, death and census records) and being able to locate them in Scottish records.

The Strike for Bread and Roses, Lawrence: 1912

with Sharon Kennedy


"The Strike for Bread and Roses: Lawrence, 1912," was commissioned by the Bread and Roses Festival Committee in Lawrence, Massachusetts, where this historic labor strike took place. One of the most important labor strikes in the United States, it was unique because it was conceived of and lead by women. These female textile workers refused to accept a cut in pay and walked out en masse in January of 1912. For more than two months, seven out of eight mills were completely shut down. Storyteller Sharon Kennedy takes you on a trip back in time to see what this strike was really like.

Education and Occupational Records

with Fiona Fitzsimons


Ireland has never had a strong industrial base, but enterprise flourished! The greater part of the Irish population were employed in small to medium enterprises, and on the land. Although literacy was low, the Irish seized on education as the way forward. In this talk, we cover how to find your ancestors' school and career records.

Why the Scots and Irish (Welsh, Bretons, Picts etc.) are NOT 'Celtic'!

with Dr. Bruce Durie


The Celts were a culture and language group that occupied central Europe about the same time as the Romans held sway - ca. 700 B.C. to 500 A.D. But the same people who today are the Gaels - in Ireland and Scotland - were around 1,550 to 2,000 years before that. The Britons and Picts are even older. The designation 'Celt' for these people is a 300-year-old mistake, perpetrated - with the best of intentions - by a Welsh scholar. And 'Pict' does not mean 'painted'. Come and discover more with Dr. Bruce Durie.

Using Y-DNA to Research Your Surname

with Maurice Gleeson


Since the Y chromosome is passed from father to son, just like the surname (i.e., family name), it is an excellent tool for surname research. This talk explores how to use Y-DNA in surname research, what it can tell you, and how joining a surname DNA project can further advance your own research.

Transatlantic Genealogy: Linking American Ancestors to Ireland

with Marie Daly


Explore methods for overcoming brick walls by widening the focus of research; highlight most common American records that detail origin in Ireland; and review Irish online databases that locate ancestors.


Things You Didn't Know You Didn't Know About Irish Genealogy

with John Grenham


Most researchers using Irish records make assumptions about the ways the records came into existence, how they're searchable and how they relate to each other. This talk aims to shake up those assumptions by teasing out little-known aspects of familiar institutions and websites, and the process of shedding fresh light on them.

Irish Civil Registration and Church Records - It's a New World!

with Donna Moughty


The landscape of Irish research has changed drastically over the past few years with the digitization of the Roman Catholic Church records by the National Library, followed by the release of the images of birth, deaths, and marriages (with restrictions) by IrishGenealogy.ie. This lecture will include a history of Irish Civil Registrations, and Roman Catholic and other Church records. It truly is a new world for Irish researchers!

Using Ancestry DNA

with Kyle Betit


An overview of the powerful features of the AncestryDNA test; the meaning of the ethnicity results and genetic communities as well as how to most effectively use the DNA cousin results and related tools.


Step AWAY From the Computer

with Christine Woodcock


Your Scottish ancestors are waiting for you to find them. But in order to do that, you may need to step away from your computer. Many records are available in Scottish repositories, but few are digitized or available online. This talk will assist you in understanding the types of records that exist at national and university archives and libraries, including estate papers, court, club, society and asylum records, and more.